Art
READING: Sylvie Fleury On Her Weapons of Seduction
Previous Story
Next Story
Previous Story
Next Story

FOR THE PAST 30 YEARS, Sylvie Fleury has cast Prada shoes in bronze, spray-painted cars with pearlescent pink nail polish, and crushed makeup palettes by driving over them — all in the name of art.

The contemporary Swiss artist is known for mixed-media work that explores the intersections between art and commodification, with her alluring appropriation of fashion codes and ready-made compositions questioning our desire for consumerism along with notions of fetishism, beauty, and gender politics.

Her most recent work subverts the beauty industry, as she reimagines eye-shadow palettes on a monumental scale to create alluring abstract shaped-canvases, with a colour palette that directly references her source material from Chanel’s ‘Pink Explosion’ to Tom Ford’s ‘Camera Obscura’.

“Why has consuming become such a big part of our world, and how did it become to be so? I see myself as a sensible woman, yet I can have these huge craving for new things, sometimes just by looking at (makeup) boxes,” shares Fleury.

She muses, “I have the wisdom to know I am being seduced; yet I’ll ask, should I deprive myself?”

Sylvie Fleury exhibition at Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac.

PHOTO COURTESY OF BEN WESTOBY

Sylvie Fleury exhibition at Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac.

PHOTO COURTESY OF BEN WESTOBY

Sylvie Fleury exhibition at Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac.

PHOTO COURTESY OF BEN WESTOBY

Sylvie Fleury exhibition at Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac.

PHOTO COURTESY OF BEN WESTOBY

Sylvie Fleury exhibition at Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac.

PHOTO COURTESY OF BEN WESTOBY

Sylvie Fleury exhibition at Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac.

PHOTO COURTESY OF BEN WESTOBY

previous arrowprevious arrow
next arrownext arrow
Slider

You can use fashion and beauty to talk about feminism, politics and consumerism.

Sylvie Fleury

Making Her Mark

The world of makeup, clothes, and shoes formed the inspiration for Fleury’s works.

“Very early on, it was important for me to make a point that my work was being made by a woman. I wasn’t just trying to fit in and try to conform. I was a woman, and I wanted to talk about this [desire for consumption] from that perspective,” says Fleury.

Fleury admits that when she created her first artwork, an installation of shopping bags with their contents, she had “no clue I was putting my (mark) on something important” that would last.

“I went shopping, and inside the bags were all the things I had bought knowing they would be part of the final artwork. They had elements that reminded me of art history, or they had a conceptual appeal, or a specific texture,” she recalls. While the branded packaging played an important role in her work, she was interested in exploring how people related to the content of the bags.

Impactful Conversations

Through her art, Fleury uses fashion as a driver for engaging dialogue.

 “When I first started showing my work I got criticised for incorporating elements of beauty and makeup, but I wanted to show that it’s not superficial. You can use fashion and beauty to talk about feminism, politics and consumerism,” she says.

With such awareness of fashion and makeup, you may wonder what the artist’s favourite brands are, but Fleury is “totally unfaithful” in her own approach, pointing out: “I don’t have a favourite brand, it changes every season. That’s what’s great about fashion.”

Subscribe

Sign up for inspiring stories, news and access, delivered to your inbox.


By signing up, you agree to periodic email marketing from Keyyes to the email address you provided.
Terms of use and Privacy policy